Model citizens, tangible connections, and compelling narratives: Female friendship and democracy in nineteenth-century America. Megan Pater Phillips

ISBN: 9781109265262

Published:

NOOKstudy eTextbook

443 pages


Description

Model citizens, tangible connections, and compelling narratives: Female friendship and democracy in nineteenth-century America.  by  Megan Pater Phillips

Model citizens, tangible connections, and compelling narratives: Female friendship and democracy in nineteenth-century America. by Megan Pater Phillips
| NOOKstudy eTextbook | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, RTF | 443 pages | ISBN: 9781109265262 | 10.42 Mb

In my dissertation, Model Citizens, Tangible Connections, and Compelling Narratives: Female Friendship and Democracy in Nineteenth-Century America, I build upon the work of scholars investigating democracy and affective citizenship and extend theMoreIn my dissertation, Model Citizens, Tangible Connections, and Compelling Narratives: Female Friendship and Democracy in Nineteenth-Century America, I build upon the work of scholars investigating democracy and affective citizenship and extend the work of scholars highlighting female friendship as a powerful, sustaining, private relationship in nineteenth-century America.

I contend that female friendships, distinct from marital and familial bonds and excluded from the republican rhetoric of brotherhood and founding fathers, offer fertile grounds for reimagining citizenship and public life.-The early national writings of Charles Brockden Brown reveal fraternity and male friendship as unsatisfying, at best, and, at worst, characterized by violence and a dangerous linkage of disclosure and intimacy, yet Browns Ormond (1799) also locates democratic hope in female friendship.

The antebellum bestsellers Susan Warners The Wide, Wide World (1850) and Harriet Beecher Stowes Uncle Toms Cabin (1852) suggest that Christianity as it is practiced, rejected, and/or revised by female friends can help to model citizenly behavior and to make democracy a lived reality. Texts dealing with race, such as Rebecca Harding Daviss Waiting for the Verdict (1867), Hannah Craftss The Bondwomans Narrative (likely 1850s), Elizabeth Keckleys Behind the Scenes (1868), and Pauline Hopkinss Contending Forces (1900) privilege female friends who model democracy as narrative practice and suggest that citizenship is creative work.

A compelling vision of citizenship also emerges in the work of journalists Margaret Fuller and Fanny Fern, who allow dynamics of friendship---honesty, conversation, imagination---to shape their texts, relationships with readers, and visions for democracy. Finally, the female friends in the fiction of Elizabeth Stoddard reject, revise, and expand institutional narratives of intimacy and thus promote intimate, narrative, and democratic possibility.-Nineteenth-century American literature suggests that female friendship at its best parallels democracy at its best.

In this literature, female friends model an ethic of compassion exceeding quid pro quo notions of exchange- privilege choice and affection over duty- and negotiate the messy and complicated terrain of intimacy- as narrative practitioners---listeners, critical readers, writers---female friends exercise their bold and generous imaginations on behalf of the friends, neighbors, and strangers who are also their fellow citizens.



Enter the sum





Related Archive Books



Related Books


Comments

Comments for "Model citizens, tangible connections, and compelling narratives: Female friendship and democracy in nineteenth-century America.":


wakademia.pl

©2014-2015 | DMCA | Contact us